Adult Recommendations

Dark Sparkler, by Amber Tamblyn

Poet and actress Amber Tamblyn (Two and a Half Men; House, MD; 127 Hours) takes on the subjects of fame, death, and memory in thirty poems inspired by the lives of actresses both famous and obscure. From Brittany Murphy (“They say good things about the body. / How bold her eyes were, bigger than Hepburn’s.”) to Jayne Mansfield (“Your neck was a study of the asterisk, / the silken shape of Sanskrit, / the sucker punch of succulents.”), she turns an unflinching eye on the pressures and perils faced by women who make careers on camera. Raw, haunting, and powerful.

Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies

This is the time of year when I start lamenting the fact that I didn't get to go on an extravagant trip to an exotic location, leading me to find books that allow me to escape (even if just for a little bit!). Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies by Alastair Bonnett helped me to do just that. Bonnett visited floating islands, hidden cities, and places not recorded on maps, reminding readers that there are still uncharted territories out there. Even if you don't get to travel outside of your hometown this summer, this book is a great reminder to put down distractions and realize that there is so much more to be seen and learned in our world. 

Out of the Silent Planet

Dr. Ransom is a professor on a solitary walking tour of the English countryside, searching for a place to lay his head for the night. Instead, he finds himself drugged, forced onto a space ship and thrust into a cosmic journey with eternal implications.

Ransom’s two captors, each with his own malicious motives, transport him to the planet Malacandra, planning to offer him as a human sacrifice to the planet’s ruler. However, as Ransom escapes and begins to explore Malacandra on his own, he discovers that its creatures are not quite what he or the other humans had imagined. In fact, this world’s beings and their story might illuminate the story of the universe, as well as the dangers facing Ransom’s home planet, earth.

This book is excellent in its own right, and is just the first in C.S. Lewis’ Space trilogy.  If you love to read about other fictional worlds or that we are part of a much bigger story, this book might just be the summer read you’ve been looking for. 

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