Adult Recommendations

Romantic Outlaws: the Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Her Daughter Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon

Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter Mary Shelley never knew each other.  Mary W. died giving birth to her daughter Mary Shelley.  Yet both women similarly defied convention, both became famous writers; both fell in love with brilliant but impossible authors; both were single mothers and had children out of wedlock; both broke out of the rigid conventions of their era and lived in exile; and both played important roles in the Romantic era during which they lived.

Gordon’s book examines each in alternating chapters of the two women's lives.  This might sound confusing to the reader but it is not.  She presents the facts of each woman's life in a fascinating way that feels as if this biography is a novelization.  Highly readable, highly recommended.

Pie School: Lessons in Fruit, Flour & Butter by Kate Lebo

A little afraid of baking pies, rolling out a crust makes you panicky, then let Pie School dissolve your fears.

The step by step instructions are well written and will aspire anyone to be a pie baker.  Great photos with easy instructions, the recipes are grouped seasonally and according to fruit type.  Time-honored classics plus delicious variations are included and with all of the skills/techniques you need in order to make a great pie.

It is berry time in Ohio, let’s roll out a pie!

Dreaming Spies, by Laurie King

Mary Russell and her husband, Sherlock Holmes, return for their thirteenth adventure (which, chronologically speaking, takes place between seventh and eighth books in the series, The Game and Locked Rooms, respectively). On their way from India to San Francisco in 1924, Russell and Holmes encounter a missing woman on a cruise ship and a nobly-born British blackmailer who had previously escaped Holmes. Soon, they’re working with a family of Japanese ninjas to avoid a major embarrassment—and a serious diplomatic incident—for Prince Hirohito, the heir to the empire of Japan.

Witty and well-paced, fans of Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes will find much to enjoy in this novel, which fills in a once-missing gap in the adventures of this detective duo. While Dreaming Spies references other incidents in the series, it can easily be read alone.