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Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One's Looking) by Christian Rudder

Caitlin's picture

Do Equal Opportunity Employers really hire without discrimination? Is Twitter destroying our capacity to write, or improving it? Can Facebook predict if your marriage will last? How is Google fighting the flu?

Christian Rudder, one of the founders of OkCupid, leverages the company’s massive collection of data as a starting point for this examination of human nature. Rudder keeps the text light and readable, skipping wonky details while being sure to note when his conclusions are limited by his data. His insights range from quirky factoids—white men are most likely to read Robert Heinlein while drinking a home-brewed beer, while Asian women would rather snack on macarons and read Norwegian Wood—to sobering insights about racism, sexism, and homophobia. A must-read for anyone interested in social media and what it reveals about our personalities and communities.

Sci-Fi Pick For Teens: Apollo's Outcasts

Jamey Barlowe has been unable to walk since childhood, the result of being born on the Moon. Jamey's father sends him, along with five other kids, back to the Moon to escape a political coup that has occurred overnight in the United States. Jamey will have to learn a whole new way to live, one that entails walking for the first time in his life. It won't be easy and it won't be safe. Jamey soon finds himself at the center of a dangerous political struggle stretching from the Earth to the Moon. 

Secret History of Wonder Woman

Vita's picture

Jill Lepore writes a story rich in historical detection about the most popular female superhero of all time while revealing a fascinating family story and history of twentieth-century feminism.

Wonder Woman was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston.  Marston's life was greatly influenced by early suffragists, starting with Emmeline Pankhurst, and including Olive Byrne and Margaret Sanger.  Marston and Byrne wrote a regular column for “Family Circle “celebrating conventional family life, even as they themselves pursued lives of extraordinary nonconformity.  Marston’s other claim to fame —-he invented the lie detector test.

  

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