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Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening

Vita's picture

MISTER OWITA'S GUIDE TO GARDENING is a beautifully written memoir by a first time author Carol Wall. The story is a very personal account of friendship between two people.  Less about gardening, the book is more about those accidental judgments that we make based on prejudices of race, money, education, and plain old general appearances.

I enjoyed this book.  It is about the power of friendship which can change our hearts and transform our lives; it is a reminder we all have more in common with each other than we think.

  

Pie School: Lessons in Fruit, Flour & Butter by Kate Lebo

Vita's picture

A little afraid of baking pies, rolling out a crust makes you panicky, then let Pie School dissolve your fears.

The step by step instructions are well written and will aspire anyone to be a pie baker.  Great photos with easy instructions, the recipes are grouped seasonally and according to fruit type.  Time-honored classics plus delicious variations are included and with all of the skills/techniques you need in order to make a great pie.

It is berry time in Ohio, let’s roll out a pie!

Liar, Temptress, Solider, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War by Karen Abbott

Hari's picture

Many books give testament to men’s bravery and sacrifice during the Civil War. In this book, the stories of four courageous women who dared to act upon their beliefs and become spies are detailed. A wealthy abolitionist in Richmond, Virginia, Elizabeth Van Lew, took considerable risks to operate a successful spy ring for the North, penetrating the Confederate White House. Knowing the possible consequences of her actions yet driven to fight for the Union, Emma Edmonds disguised herself as a man and joined the Army of the Potomac. Rose O’Neale Greenhow, a widow living in Washington, used her feminine wiles to seduce Northern politicians into disclosing information she then sent to Southern generals via her young daughter. Brash Belle Boyd, too, used her feminine charms to seduce men on both sides of the war, serving as a courier and spy for the Confederate Army.

Abbott’s extensive research and storytelling ability combine to ensure a captivating glimpse of this little-known part of the Civil War.

Picture Book Selection: Splash, Anna Hibiscus!

Anna Hibiscus is a little girl who lives in amazing Africa.  In this Anna Hibiscus story, Anna and her family all go to the beach and are all too busy to splash with her in the water.  The waves want to play with Anna, which make her laugh and laugh.  Soon all of the family are together in the water.  A fun and wet story about families at the beach for ages 4 and up.

Adventure Pick for Teens!:I Have a Bad Feeling About This

Henry Lambert would rather play video games than spend time in the great outdoors–but that doesn't make him a wuss. Henry's dad doesn't agree and thinks his masculinity needs a boost. Which is why Henry is being shipped off to Strongwoods Survival Camp. Strongwoods isn't exactly as advertised. It looks like the victim of a zombie apocalypse, the “camp director” is a psycho drill sergeant, and Henry's sure he saw a sign written in blood… 

Juvenile Fiction Selection: Dory and the Real True Friend by Abby Hanlon

Dory is back and this time she's ready to start a new school year and make a real friend.  Dory's older siblings, Luke and Violet, have convinced Dory that it's time to leave her imaginary friend, Mary, at home for the new school year and leave her crazy imaginings behind.  On the first day of school she meets Rosabelle, a girl with an imagination as big as Dory's, but they don't hit it off right away. When she and Rosabelle bump into each other at the park their imaginations collide and send them on an adventure.  Now if only Dory could convince her brother and sister that Rosabelle exists and that she has finally made a real true friend!  Adorable illustrations add a lot of charm and will entertain young readers.  Look for Dory Fantasmagory if you want to start at the beginning. (Grades 2-4 School Library Journal)

Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One's Looking) by Christian Rudder

Caitlin's picture

Do Equal Opportunity Employers really hire without discrimination? Is Twitter destroying our capacity to write, or improving it? Can Facebook predict if your marriage will last? How is Google fighting the flu?

Christian Rudder, one of the founders of OkCupid, leverages the company’s massive collection of data as a starting point for this examination of human nature. Rudder keeps the text light and readable, skipping wonky details while being sure to note when his conclusions are limited by his data. His insights range from quirky factoids—white men are most likely to read Robert Heinlein while drinking a home-brewed beer, while Asian women would rather snack on macarons and read Norwegian Wood—to sobering insights about racism, sexism, and homophobia. A must-read for anyone interested in social media and what it reveals about our personalities and communities.

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