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Juvenile Fiction Selection: Audrey (cow)

Audrey is a Charolais cow living a happy and poetic life on Bittersweet farm, that is until the day they take her mother away. Confronted with her new reality, Audrey, with the help of many farm friends, devises an escape plan to avoid her “food cow” fate. Inspired by the true story of Charlene Mookin–aka “Cincinnati Freedom”–this story is a fun adventure for animals lovers of all ages.  

The Expats

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Kate Moore and her husband decide to accept a job offer in Luxemburg.   While her husband begins his new job and Kate spends more time with her children she must learn how to adjust to the daily life in a new country.  Kate begins to notice her husband’s suspicious behavior and also becomes suspicious of another American couple they have befriended.   As she begins to investigate she becomes nervous they are connected to her past.   Mystery lovers will enjoy this novel which keeps them guessing until the very end.

Kahiki Supper Club: A Polynesian Paradise in Columbus

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Take a set back into retro Columbus with the book Kahiki Supper Club by David Meyers.

The Kahiki, a South Seas themed restaurant, was located in Columbus on East Broad Street. The restaurant was easy to identify since it was shaped like a Polynesian fighting boat, with giant flaming Mo’ai heads outside the main doors.  Entering you walked into a faux South Pacific village with tropical rainforest, totally exotic.  The best was ordering up the “Mystery Drink” which came in a bowl with a smoking volcano and served by the “Mystery Girl” who danced the drink to your table after being summoned by a giant gong, fun!

Shooting Victoria: Madness, Mayhem, and the Rebirth of the British Monarchy by Paul Thomas Murphy

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Many historians have made the argument that without Victoria, the British monarchy would have fallen like so many others in the revolutions that swept Europe in 1840s. This text takes the interesting approach in analyzing history through the eight assassination attempts made on the Queen during her 64-year reign. To read about how a few madmen and criminals challenged Victoria and changed Britain, pick up this book about one of Britain’s favorite monarchs.

When Books Went To War: The Stories That Helped Us Win World War II, by Molly Guptill Manning

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On May 10, 1933, German students (with official encouragement) burned an estimated 25,000 books in a symbolic act meant to “purify” Germany of Jewish influence. The Nazis would continue to burn books throughout their reign, both in their country and in the countries they invaded, in an attempt to stamp out any thought they deemed dangerous to National Socialism, ultimately destroying over 100 million volumes. People around the world reacted in outrage and horror, and in the US, groups of librarians, citizens, politicians, writers, and publishers came together to fight back. Through organized book donation drives and the invention of an entirely new book format—the Armed Services Edition—these fighters in World War II’s “War of Ideas” put 132 million books in the hands of American servicemen and their allies. Their work inspired an entire generation with a love of reading and enshrined books like Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby as American classics. When Books Went to War tells their unforgettable story.

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