Teens

December Teen Reads

Tracie's picture

This is a guest blog, by Eileen F., a local high school student and summer intern here at the UAPL.  Eileen recommends several reads for teens for December.

December is finally here! The holiday season is kicking into high gear and all the teens out there  are probably counting down the days until winter break. With winter break comes free time,  and what better way to fill it than with reading some holiday books to get you in the spirit?  Here are some recommendations that are sure to get you excited and keep you entertained  during your winter break!

cover shot for Dash & Lily's Book of Dares by David Levithan

 

Dash & Lily's Book of Dares  by David Levithan and Rachel Cohn

 Told in the alternating voices of Dash and Lily, two teens who carry on a winter  scavenger hunt in Christmas-time New York. 

 

   

 

 

Cover image for Let It Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle

 

Let It Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle

In three intertwining short stories, several high school couples experience the trials and tribulations along with the joys of romance during a Christmas Eve snowstorm in a small town.

 

 

 

 

cover image for Wintertown by Stephen Emond

 

Winter Town by Stephen Emond

Evan and Lucy, childhood best friends who grew apart after years of seeing one another only during Christmas break, begin a romance at age seventeen but his choice to mindlessly follow his father's plans for an Ivy League education rather than becoming the cartoonist he longs to be, and her more destructive choices in the wake of family problems, pull them apart.

 

 

 

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A miser learns the true meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and foretell his future

 

 

 

 

Cover image for Jingle Boy by Kieran Scott

 

Jingle Boy by Kieran Scott

In this electronic book, sixteen-year-old Paul Nicholas, long a Christmas-tradition keeper, is beginning to understand why his best friend hates the holiday season.

 

 

 

Have fun reading and enjoy your holidays!

Sci-Fi Pick For Teens: Apollo's Outcasts

Jamey Barlowe has been unable to walk since childhood, the result of being born on the Moon. Jamey's father sends him, along with five other kids, back to the Moon to escape a political coup that has occurred overnight in the United States. Jamey will have to learn a whole new way to live, one that entails walking for the first time in his life. It won't be easy and it won't be safe. Jamey soon finds himself at the center of a dangerous political struggle stretching from the Earth to the Moon. 

Military Teen Fiction

Dena's picture

Today is Veteran's Day, a day that America honors those men and women who currently serve, and have served, in the US military. Two of the most important people in my life served in the military: my grandmother, who served on the WAVES during WWII and taught men how to fly planes, but because she was a woman she wasn't actually allowed to fly them herself; and my husband, who served on the USAF for 20 years, during which he engaged in three wars and a number of insurgencies around the world, often in combat. 

Here at the library we get a number of teens who are curious about the military, and are interested in reading both fiction and non-fiction books about life as a soldier. Need some suggestions? Here ya' go! 

Soldier Doll by Jennifer Gold  I know, you're thrown by the fact that this is about a doll; don't be. The soldier doll is simply used to guide the reader through a number of wars, and to introduce us to the lives of the soldiers and civilians effected, and as a symbol–for hope, or death, only the reader can decide. 

 

The Right Fight by Chris Lynch  Readers who like to read about WWII will enjoy the newest Chris Lynch,  about a young man who is drafted immediately before the beginning of WWII and sent to the North African campaign. 

 

Violins of Autumn by Amy McAuley  Fans of spy novels will enjoy this WWII fiction about 17-year-old Betty who parachutes into German-occupied France to join the underground Resistance as a spy. 

 

Dirt Bikes, Drones, and Other Ways to Fly by Conrad Wesselhoeft  This book is awesome; it is actually on my Mock Printz list. Arlo Santiago lives life a moment at a time. His sister is slowly dying of a debilitating disease, and he and his family are still grieving over the death of his mother. To settle his mind he rides dirt bikes and plays drone warfare video games, both very well. So well in fact that the US military have taken notice and want him to fly real drones. 

 

 

 

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