humor

April is the Coolest Month

Bonnie's picture

April is the coolest month, mixing poetry and jazz.  It comes in like a laugh with National Humor Month and April Fools Day.  It goes green with Earth Day.  Shakespeare manages to get a word in then it is followed by May and June (two of my favorite months).  Libraries are right there in the middle of everything. They always are!

You may have to overlook the April showers and tax day but I think the payoff is well worth the rainy days. Here are some great books. Before April is over you will have millions more to choose from!

Related:  

  • National Humor Month
  • UAPL joins the Central Library Consortium April 9, 2014
  • National Poetry Month
  • Jazz Appreciation Month
  • National Library Week: April 13-19, 2014
  • Earth Day: April 22, 2014
  • Shakespeare's 450th Birthday & Talk Like Shakespeare Day:April 23, 2014 

Angst Written: Recent Books about Anxiety

Bonnie's picture

Allie Brosh’s book, Hyperbole and a half : unfortunate situations, flawed coping mechanisms, mayhem, and other things that happened, is not for everyone.  It's a collection of illustrated short stories chronicling the author's personal struggles dealing with everyday life. Either you will connect with her style right away or you won't. Judging by the popularity of the book and her blog of the same name, she's connecting with a legion of fans and supporters.  I'm one them. The thing I love about her work is the way her purposefully child-like drawing and self-deprecating humor combine to make complex emotions like anxiety and depression visible in a highly accessible way.  

It's me on the inside. That's what I'm like when I view myself. I am this crude absurd little thing, this squiggly little thing on the inside. So it's more of a raw representation of what it feels like to be me.  Allie Brosh talking to Terry Gross on NPR about her artwork 

 

Anxiety is no stranger to many of us.  The authors of these three books allow us to see their personal demons.  Who knew cheese could be frightening?  But more than that, they help us to see our way to understanding and compassion.  

 

 

"The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Frye" by Rachel Joyce

Vita's picture

Harold Fyre is retired, henpecked, and indifferent to life.  Then he receives a letter from a elderly friend who is dying.  Rather than mail her correspondence Harold decides to walk 600 miles to deliver his message in person.  His trek is peppered with fascinating characters who help unlock Harold's buried spirit and renew his sense of life. 

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