Little Kids @ UAPL

Get Ready To Read! Print Awareness

Rebecca's picture

Print awareness is noticing print everywhere! Print awareness is knowing that the squiggly lines on a page symbolize something meaningful. Print awareness is the knowledge that writing in English is read from left to right and that the text flows from the top of the page to the bottom. Another aspect of print awareness is being familiar with how a book works; that books have covers, and pages to be turned, left to right. 

Helping your child develop this skill is easier than you think. Watch this video for some at-home tips:

Why not make your own book at home? You and your child can make up and write your own story,  practice writing their name, or may be even paste photos of friends and family. Make a point to design the cover, come up with a title, and don't forget to add the author's name!!

 

Get Ready To Read! Phonological Awareness

Rebecca's picture

Phonological awareness is a child’s awareness that sentences can be broken down into words, syllables and sounds. Music naturally encourages development of this pre-reading skill by allowing kids to play with language using rhythm, rhyming and repetition. Take a peek at this short video for more information:

 

Did you know that it is very easy to make your musical instruments at home? Check out some great ideas from Nancy Stewart!

At the UAPL youth department, we have an extensive collection of children’s music.  Check out some CDs and have your very own sing-a-long at home. 

 

Get Ready To Read! Building Narrative Skills

Rebecca's picture

Mother and baby readingToday’s children are expected to have strong pre-literacy skills before they enter kindergarten. How can parents ensure that they are providing the right experiences for their children to develop these skills? Many parents don’t realize that literacy education actually begins in infancy. 

The good news is that helping your child attain such skills is much easier than you may think. Almost ANY activity that you do with your child is helping them develop literacy skills. It can be as simple as talking and singing to your child, reading to them, or even describing to them what they are feeling, hearing, tasting, touching, seeing and doing.

One simple activity to start with is looking at pictures.  Look at family photos, or pictures from books and magazines and talk about what you see. Better yet, check out some of the UAPL’s wordless picture books. Snuggle up in your favorite comfy chair, look at the pictures and make up your own stories! This activity helps your child develop narrative skills.  We have many wordless books, but some of our favorites are:

 

Get Ready To Read! Print Motivation

Rebecca's picture

baby boy with book

One of the first early literacy skills to develop is print motivation. Print motivation is a child's interest in and enjoyment of books. Parents can cultivate this skill early on by reading to their infants. Even though they aren't able to follow the story, they still very much enjoy hearing their parent's voice. If children witness their parents enjoying reading, they learn to view reading as a fun activity. Parents need to make books accessible, proudly display them on a shelf, as prized possessions and create a cozy spot dedicated to reading together. And let's not forget trips to the library!! The UAPL has amazing storytimes and other youth programs, and little ones can get their very own library card!!

Here are some books from our collection, chosen especially for their enjoyment potential:

Do-It-Yourself Sensory Bottles

Sue's picture

Create some fun, engaging sensory bottles for your baby or toddler. These are easy to make and let your child explore how different objects move and sound inside the bottles. Your baby or toddler can roll them, bang them, and watch the objects move around. Adding water or corn syrup to some of the bottles will create a different effect.

Below are pictures of the ones that I made. You can use a variety of different materials – just look around your home to see what you have! Just be sure to hot glue the caps on so the materials stay safely inside.

Materials:

  • Empty Water Bottles
  • A variety of materials for the bottles: brightly colored puff balls, rice, beans, popcorn, glitter and water, aluminum foil pieces, buttons
  • Hot Glue Gun
  • Water or corn syrup

           

        

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